Vayarta Shoes are the perfect travel shoe

Packable, comfortable, and insanely chic, these unisex loafers are the one pair of shoes you need to take on your next trip.

Nothing has the potential to derail a good packing job like a pair of shoes. There’s only so much stuffing, squeezing, and—for lack of a better word—smushing they can take before you have to either give up and leave them at home, or take everything out of your suitcase and start over again. And while I love a great packing challenge, I love a packing solution more, which is why I was so excited to discover what just might be the perfect travel shoe.

Vayarta loafers are many things: Handmade (in ultra-soft leather by local artisans in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico), hand-dyed (in colors that range from soft blush to bright cobalt to basic black), and unisex. They’re also utterly simple, with clean lines and a minimalist design that manages to be eye-catching in its restraint. The shoes are the brainchild of Maryam Nassir Zadeh boutique co-founder Uday Kak and brand partners Sarada Ravindra and Andre Wiesmayr, who were looking to design an elevated version of the everyday loafer. What they’ve also done is create a travel shoe that eliminates the need for pretty much any other footwear.

You can pack them in your suitcase (the soft soles make them infinitely more smushable than your traditional loafers) or wear them on the plane, where their lightweight, slipper-like design will keep you comfortable no matter how long your flight is. And once you land, pair them with wide-leg trousers and a crisp button-down, cropped skinny jeans and a silk top, a floral summer dress, or your beach uniform of cutoffs and a striped tank—in other words, the extra outfits you were able to pack with all that free space.

Shop their latest designs at : https://vayarta.com

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Outfit of the day: styling with Off white Paul Smith and Thaqafah Shoes

Outfit of the day: Off White multi sweater, Thaqafah silver sparkle Babouche , Paul Smith dotted navy slacks

Sweater: off White https://www.farfetch.com/shopping/women/items.aspx

Pants: Paul Smith https://www.farfetch.com/shopping/women/items.aspx

Shoes: Thaqafah https://www.etsy.com/shop/Thaqafah

Viviano Sue (Tokyo) ready to wear ss2018 collection

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Viviano Sue is an Avant-Garde designer, passionate for pushing the boundaries of fashion. Having lived in the United States and China, he came to Japan to study fashion at Bunka Academy in Tokyo. These diverse cultures have influenced his aesthetic as a designer. His inspirations are drawn from structures in architecture, geometry and nature. After achieving his Master degree from Bunka Fashion Graduate University, Viviano has since built his own brand and is now read to take this to the new stage. A departure from his background in Couture and Bridal, Viviano is poised to define the coming season through his debut “No-Gender” ready-to wear line of unique, edgy, and exquisite garments.

 

 

Shop the collection here:  http://vivianosue.com/top.html

Lovely winter footwear by iamintentionally_____

Check out some of these beautiful boots coming from the Sample bin of @iamintentionally______ . I promise you will not be disappointed by these quirky yet chic picks from this brand.

Shop the collection here: https://www.intentionallyblank.us

Outfit of the day: Thaqafah Shoes paired with Lindex Apparel

Styling #Thaqafah #shoes pale blue and green #woven slip ons with @babba.c fashion blogger outfit of the day teal velour sweater and teal pleated skirt by @lindexofficial #Lindex was a perfect blend of colors.

Blogger: https://www.instagram.com/babba.c/

Outfit: https://www.instagram.com/lindexofficial/

Shoes: https://www.etsy.com/shop/Thaqafah

Outfit of the day: Styling with Thaqafah shoes, Loewe and MSGM

Shoes: Thaqafah https://www.etsy.com/shop/Thaqafah?ref=seller-platform-mcnav

Coat: MSGM https://www.farfetch.com/shopping/women/msgm-striped-coat

Bag: Loewe https://www.farfetch.com/shopping/women/loewe-hammock-cant-take-it-small-bag

Personal Style is it! Find your own and be you.

What is personal style? What determines whether someone has “good” personal style or whether it’s “bad”? Does such a thing exist? Can you call it “taste”? How do you define taste?

We’ve talk a lot about this new era of personal style. We say that trends are dead. That in order to be a successful designer today, you’ve got to be reactive; no longer do members of the upper echelon dictate what we want to wear so much as they do respond to our hankerings. The most compelling proof of this concept is Vetements, a label that exploded into fashion last year, whose creative director is already so respected that he’s been tapped to take over at Balenciaga.

But that’s the conflicting thing about the death of trends. They aren’t actually dead. Personal style is just the trend that we’re leaning into right now.

But what does that mean?

If you think about a designer like Dries Van Noten, a man who has been consistently lauded for the styling at his shows, you get to see a solid case for an interesting definition of personal style. At Dries, personal style is what happens when you put average stuff together and suddenly, it’s extraordinary. Standout pieces exist: bras made entirely from paillettes, brocade coats enveloped in palm trees — but outside the statement stuff, when pulled apart, what you get is a lot of well made clothing that’s remarkably unremarkable.

I was recently at Miu Miu’s shop thinking that the impact of the new clothes on display were best represented at the show six months earlier where they were piled together to evince the spirit of a sort of a personal style pioneer: The Eccentric. And per this eccentric, who better to define the modern day version than Gucci’s much talked about Alessandro Michele? Ditto that for Prada’s most recent fall collection. The most common criticism among the reporters and market editors for Miuccia Prada’s show was that once taken apart they’d just look like regular clothes. But to argue this is to miss the point.

We’re not supposed to feel like our clothes put us in boxes anymore. They don’t say everything about who we are or who we’re not. Something I have always admired about the aforementioned Dries Van Noten is that when you walk into his world, what you find is that the dress you’re eyeing as a twenty-something has just been sold to a middle-aged blonde woman with a bob in town from Alsace. Those are clothes that pack a punch — that speak to your personality, but also to her personality, and they do it for completely divergent reasons. Isn’t that power? To appeal to so many kinds of women at so many different junctures?

Women were never Just One Thing, but we were made to feel that way by the clothes that we elected to define us.

AYR’s Maggie Winter put it well when she said, “There’s nothing today’s woman can’t do — she isn’t limited by a label or a logo.” This is true of a silhouette or garment color, too. That a look by Gucci, or Prada, or Miu Miu or whomever could feel like it speaks so accurately to “the era of personal style” because of how kooky it looks is a surface way to interpret the clothes. I only realize that now.

It’s really when you break apart these collections to learn that they consist of tons of regular garments that appeal to tons of regular women that you see real personal style on display. And that personal style, by the way, isn’t about the clothes or how you wear them. It’s a sort of political statement that rejects our being typecast and articulates our relationship with choice. Not just our ability to choose, but also our right — a choice! — not to.

Reblogged from : Manrepeller.com

Outfit of the day: Maison Margiela/Calvin Klein/Thaqafah Shoes

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How we Thaqafah……… @maisonmargiela orange lux hoodie @calvinklein ribbed fitted green skirt @thaqafah_shoes metallic and hunter green bi-color babouche

Get your custom pair at: http://www.thaqafahshoes.com

GUCCI TAKES A STAND AGAINST ANIMAL FUR

It’s the latest in a growing group of luxury brands to make the fur-free commitment

 

 

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Hold onto your fur-lined Gucci loafers (if you’re still wearing those): The maximalist, Italian luxury label headed up by Alessandro Michele is the latest company to announce a commitment to going fur-free.

Gucci CEO Marco Bizarri made the announcement during the 2017 Kering Talk at The London College of Fashion on Wednesday, and the Humane Society followed up with a joint press release alongside the fashion brand and the Fur Free Alliance — a coalition of more than 40 animal protection organizations working together to end the fur trade. The brand will cease releasing fur product beginning with its spring 2018 collection and will continue to be supported by the Humane Society of the U.S. and LAV in “identifying and reducing its impact on animals and the environment.”

To be clear, the definition of “animal fur” by which Gucci is subscribing means “any animal skin, or part thereof, with hair or fur fibers attached thereto, either in its raw or processed state or the pelt of any animal killed for the animal’s fur.” That means mink, fox, rabbit, karakul lamb and raccoon dog are off limits, while lamb, goat and alpaca can still be used.

“Being socially responsible is one of Gucci’s core values, and we will continue to strive to do better for the environment and animals,” said Bizarri. “With the help of HSUS and LAV, Gucci is excited to take this next step and hopes it will help inspire innovation and raise awareness, changing the luxury fashion industry for the better.”

“Gucci’s new fur free policy marks a game-changer for the whole luxury fashion industry to follow,” added Joh Vinding.

Indeed, it’s a pretty big announcement for Gucci, whose creative director has incorporated statement-making, dyed and printed fur pieces into his collections — even for spring and resort — since joining the house in 2015. (Gucci, of course, used fur before that as well.) Right now, no less than eight mink fur coats can be found on the brand’s website, and that’s to make no mention of the brand’s ubiquitous fur-lined loafer mules. The brand landed itself in hot water with PETA over its use of kangaroo fur in the popular shoe style, which has likely been a big moneymaker for the brand. In 2015, not long after the style was introduced, Kering defended its use of kangaroo, issuing a statement to Quartz claiming that it “can be classified under our guidelines as a sustainable fur.” While a few loafers are still labeled as kangaroo fur online, a rep for Gucci confirmed that they will all be made with lamb going forward.

According to a separate press release from Gucci, the brand will be auctioning off remaining fur items with proceeds benefitting LAV and the Humane Society.

Gucci is the latest in a string of luxury brands to make commitments to going fur-free: There’s fellow Kering-owned label Stella McCartney, as well as Giorgio Armani, Hugo Boss and, on the retail side, Yoox Net-a-Porter Group. We would not be surprised to see fellow members of Kering’s portfolio joining them in the near future given the conglomerate’s well-publicized commitment to sustainability.

 

Re-blogged from http://www.fashionista.com