Outfit of the day: Thaqafah Shoes paired with Lindex Apparel

Styling #Thaqafah #shoes pale blue and green #woven slip ons with @babba.c fashion blogger outfit of the day teal velour sweater and teal pleated skirt by @lindexofficial #Lindex was a perfect blend of colors.

Blogger: https://www.instagram.com/babba.c/

Outfit: https://www.instagram.com/lindexofficial/

Shoes: https://www.etsy.com/shop/Thaqafah

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Outfit of the day: Styling with Thaqafah shoes, Loewe and MSGM

Shoes: Thaqafah https://www.etsy.com/shop/Thaqafah?ref=seller-platform-mcnav

Coat: MSGM https://www.farfetch.com/shopping/women/msgm-striped-coat

Bag: Loewe https://www.farfetch.com/shopping/women/loewe-hammock-cant-take-it-small-bag

Personal Style is it! Find your own and be you.

What is personal style? What determines whether someone has “good” personal style or whether it’s “bad”? Does such a thing exist? Can you call it “taste”? How do you define taste?

We’ve talk a lot about this new era of personal style. We say that trends are dead. That in order to be a successful designer today, you’ve got to be reactive; no longer do members of the upper echelon dictate what we want to wear so much as they do respond to our hankerings. The most compelling proof of this concept is Vetements, a label that exploded into fashion last year, whose creative director is already so respected that he’s been tapped to take over at Balenciaga.

But that’s the conflicting thing about the death of trends. They aren’t actually dead. Personal style is just the trend that we’re leaning into right now.

But what does that mean?

If you think about a designer like Dries Van Noten, a man who has been consistently lauded for the styling at his shows, you get to see a solid case for an interesting definition of personal style. At Dries, personal style is what happens when you put average stuff together and suddenly, it’s extraordinary. Standout pieces exist: bras made entirely from paillettes, brocade coats enveloped in palm trees — but outside the statement stuff, when pulled apart, what you get is a lot of well made clothing that’s remarkably unremarkable.

I was recently at Miu Miu’s shop thinking that the impact of the new clothes on display were best represented at the show six months earlier where they were piled together to evince the spirit of a sort of a personal style pioneer: The Eccentric. And per this eccentric, who better to define the modern day version than Gucci’s much talked about Alessandro Michele? Ditto that for Prada’s most recent fall collection. The most common criticism among the reporters and market editors for Miuccia Prada’s show was that once taken apart they’d just look like regular clothes. But to argue this is to miss the point.

We’re not supposed to feel like our clothes put us in boxes anymore. They don’t say everything about who we are or who we’re not. Something I have always admired about the aforementioned Dries Van Noten is that when you walk into his world, what you find is that the dress you’re eyeing as a twenty-something has just been sold to a middle-aged blonde woman with a bob in town from Alsace. Those are clothes that pack a punch — that speak to your personality, but also to her personality, and they do it for completely divergent reasons. Isn’t that power? To appeal to so many kinds of women at so many different junctures?

Women were never Just One Thing, but we were made to feel that way by the clothes that we elected to define us.

AYR’s Maggie Winter put it well when she said, “There’s nothing today’s woman can’t do — she isn’t limited by a label or a logo.” This is true of a silhouette or garment color, too. That a look by Gucci, or Prada, or Miu Miu or whomever could feel like it speaks so accurately to “the era of personal style” because of how kooky it looks is a surface way to interpret the clothes. I only realize that now.

It’s really when you break apart these collections to learn that they consist of tons of regular garments that appeal to tons of regular women that you see real personal style on display. And that personal style, by the way, isn’t about the clothes or how you wear them. It’s a sort of political statement that rejects our being typecast and articulates our relationship with choice. Not just our ability to choose, but also our right — a choice! — not to.

Reblogged from : Manrepeller.com

Outfit of the day: Maison Margiela/Calvin Klein/Thaqafah Shoes

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How we Thaqafah……… @maisonmargiela orange lux hoodie @calvinklein ribbed fitted green skirt @thaqafah_shoes metallic and hunter green bi-color babouche

Get your custom pair at: http://www.thaqafahshoes.com

Adorable and must have shoe bling!

Here we have an absolutely innovative original take on the classic shoe kitties by Afrofly accessories brand. The kitties are absolutely gorgeous and the design is to die for.

I can just see these being worn as extra mug for those favorite pair of plain Jane loafers, oxfords, boots, or even sandals. These kitties would provide a complete makeover for your kicks.

Ok so now a little about the brand and designer. So as I understand it, the Afrofly brand was born in London by designer  Leslyn Frasier who has experience in shoe design and art.

Afrofly’s designs are also influenced by many different cultures which makes a melting pot of ideas that will be and is seen in the Afrifly’s accessories design.

 

I love accessories that take my breath away at first sight, and make me drool at the same time, and these kilties  did not fall short in making that happen. I solute the designer miss Leslyn for bringing us a twist on the classic kiltie without compromising good design and innovation.

 

You can purchase these beauties here at her official site:

http://afrofly.bigcartel.com/products

 

With Love,

Style Diversity

Kat Maconie and Her Amazing Shoes

So, I was searching the net one day (as always) about a month or so ago and went to my favorite shoe sight for amazing shoes http://www.solestruck.com and lo and behold I saw the most eclectic, beautiful, artsy shoes that I have seen in a very long time.

Take a look and then I’ll tell you all about the designer:

 
Drum roll please……………… The designer of these beauties is non other than miss Kat Maconie, London based designer who started her brilliant shoe brand in 2009, absolutely dazzling the shoe world as we know it. Have a read about her down below from what we took off of her site.

ABOUT KAT MACONIE

Kat if you are reading this post, we wanna thank you for creating beautiful eclectic shoes for us gals who like to stand out and be unique apart from everyone else.
If you love Kat’s shoes then you can find her ss2016 collection here :

http://www.katmaconie.com/pages/about-kat-maconie

With love

Style-Diversity

2015 Fashion Graduate Roberta Einer Killing The Fashion Game

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Ever wondered how you get from your grad collection to launching your own line at London Fashion Week? Today, Westminster graduate and womenswear designer Roberta Einer presented her debut SS16 collection as part of the last day of LFW.

The 23-year-old grad has already got a stellar CV behind her that includes several internships with some mega creatives (Mary Katrantzou, McQueen, Roksanda Ilincic and Claire Barrow), plus some design-defining experience working as a print and embroidery assistant at Balmain in Paris, before finishing up her degree this year. She tells us: ‘I went to Balmain with a minimal aesthetic. Olivier Rousteing always said, “It’s clothes, just have fun.” Now I experiment more.’

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So what makes her designs stand out? Epic hand embroidery + beautiful embellishment + fun factor to create textured heavyweight masterpieces in bubblegum shades with all-over beading, pile-’em-on sequins and racks of ribbon. Think mermaid vibes mixed with a cheerleading squad from Clueless.

But what’s it like prepping for your first solo show? We got Roberta to share a few BTS snaps for a (very sparkly) sneak peek, and then popped down to the Hotel Café Royal on Regent Street to check it out…

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Ready for the close-up! Roberta says: ‘I see always see the texture and the weight of things first.’ Hello all-over bead work, pile-’em-on sequins, and racks of ribbon. 🎀🎀🎀🎀🎀

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‘I figure out all the graphics on the computer, it needs to be on a scale of 1mm to be right for the embroiderers. This hand-embroidered gown made out of 15 metres of fabric is a real dream dress and probably my favourite piece I have ever done! SO EXCITED.’

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The collection? Cute as candy. The dreamy delicate, sheer embroidered dresses styled with black tied chokers…

 

Tell us what you think about this new designer collection, we think her collection is fun and fancy!

Dolce & Gabbana and the Muslim market

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Dolce & Gabbana is the latest brand to target Muslim shoppers, introducing a line of hijabs and abayas.

With floral prints, lacy patterns and the occasional pop of color, the Italian fashion house put its own twist on the usually dark-colored cloaks and matching head scarves traditionally worn by Muslim women.

The new collection “is a reverie amidst the desert dunes and skies of the Middle East: an enchanting visual story about the grace and beauty of the marvelous women of Arabia,” Dolce & Gabbana wrote on its Instagram page.

The company is hardly the first to tap into the Muslim market — H&M featured a hijab-wearing model in a recent ad, and Tommy Hilfiger, DKNY and Mango are among the brands that have launched Ramadan collections.

It’s an increasingly smart business move, as Muslim customers spent $230 billion globally on clothing in 2014, and it’s predicted that figure will rise to $327 billion in 2020, according to a report from Dinar Standard, a market research firm.

Melanie Elturk, CEO of Haute Hijab, told TODAY she’s excited that companies are finally wising up to the fact that Muslim women have money to spend, especially ones who wear hijabs and abayas. “That’s their entire wardrobe!” she said. “They don’t have a plethora of jeans and tops and sweaters.”

While she allows that companies like Dolce & Gabbana might simply be trying to infiltrate a lucrative market, as opposed to making a political statement, she’s still “ecstatic” to see brands post photos of presumably Muslim models.

“Just to see a model in full hijab and an abaya is remarkable,” she said. “It’s something I truly never thought I would see.”

But she warns companies have to be careful about catering to traditional Muslim women.

“This market is so nuanced and deeply rooted in faith that if you get one thing wrong in an ad or with the imagery, you can completely miss the mark,” Elturk said, pointing out that part of a model’s leg is visible in one of the Dolce & Gabbana images, which defeats the purpose of wearing the abaya.

While pieces from Dolce & Gabbana’s new collection are likely to be priced well into the thousands, there are plenty of brands making fashionable hijabs for affordable prices, like Elturk’s own Haute Hijab, Inayah or even Etsy, where prices start around $10.

 

 

Reblogged from : http://www.today.com

Barefoot shoes are the closest to Earth walking than anything else

We have decided to put our 2 cents In the barefoot shoe game. Thaqafah has a new ,leather ,stylish ,handmade,barefoot shoe with padded bottoms for light indoor/outdoor walking.

The idea for these barefoot shoes was first hatched after thinking of an easier alternative for women to change into when their feet hurt them after walking in heels all day. So instead of walking completely barefoot because of sore feet, or wearing bulky sneakers with a dress or skirt, thn just slip into some chic, lightweight barefoot shoes.

  

So here’s the result in brief, after searching for cobblers and sending samples for the right fit. Hope everyone likes them, and finds them useful for all of your barefoot, stylish needs. They come in a small range of colors for now, but we plan on expanding the color and style range with each collection.

Barefoot shoes:  sizes 7-12 for both men an women……….

   

                 

Keffiyeh Fashion

I came accross this beautiful top by just scrolling through instagram earlier this afternoon, and the top happened to be made from the famouse Palestinian keffiyeh fabric. The fabric is usually used to make scarves, that the military men wear, and religious men from the Muslim world wear. But somewhere down the line someone had a genius idea to make this beautiful scarf fabric into clothing.

Namely a new emerging brand called: Cecilie Copenhagen 

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Well, we had to put our two cents in by jumping on board to assemble some keffiyeh threads of our own, with a twist. The fabric is so chic and unique, that the style pair ups are endless. 

Have a look at what we put together: 

  

Paired with some leather barefoot shoes.